TR Footnotes FN_1013 : Page 1

FooTN TeS The Independent Voice of the Towing Industry ® ToWiNg & recovery October 2013 w y o no hl nt inf 2 mo o Page 2 p e re Se Keeping Industry Pros On Their Tows www.trfootnotes.com StAte towing ASSociAtionS in your next newsletter, we invite you to offer your members a Free copy of Towing & recovery Footnotes sent to them monthly at no cost! Members simply email a request for a free subscription, with a complete mail-ing address and phone number, to: ann@trfootnotes.com or they can sign up online at www.trfootnotes.com A free Footnotes subscription: Another fine service from your local towing association! An invitAtion for big rig recovery A formidable roadblock in the towing sPotLight In This Issue: Big Rig Recovery November: Holiday Issue: Families In Towing advertise now! Call David Abraham 877-219-7734, Ext 1 Do it Once Do it Right Clear the scene fast and final with a WreckMaster checklist by AllAN T. DuFFiN Volume 24, Number 6 x $3.95 x ©2013 CAUSey enTerPriSeS, LLC. x ALL rigHTS reSerVeD. w reckMaster created its own check-lists to assist tow operators with recoveries of big rig vehicles. “The Wreck-Master discipline was established to help an operator implement a routine of attack in setting up for a successful recovery,” said David Bouvia, who has been with WreckMaster (www.wreck-master.com) since 2002 and is their full-time lead instructor. He presents seminars and demonstrations at trade shows in the U.S. and internationally, and also contributes to WreckMaster’s research and development department. “There are elements of concern that, if overlooked, can result in tragedy,” said Bouvia. “A step-by-step procedural process will lead to the reduction of the chance of injury, damage, or loss through better management of the risk associated with recovery.” He added that there are “checklists within the checklist” as well. Accordingly, Bouvia detailed Wreck-Master’s approach, which is distilled into an acronym: SCene. • E xplain • E xecute • S urvey • C alculate • N o’s See Do IT oNCE, page 3 P .O. Box 64397 Virginia Beach, VA 23467 Towing & recovery Footnotes ® PrST STD U.S. POSTAge PAiD peoria, il permit no. 315

Do it Once Do it RIGHT

Allan T. Duffin

<br /> WreckMaster created its own checklists to assist tow operators with recoveries of big rig vehicles. “The Wreck- Master discipline was established to help an operator implement a routine of attack in setting up for a successful recovery,” said David Bouvia, who has been with WreckMaster (www.wreckmaster.com) since 2002 and is their full-time lead instructor. He presents seminars and demonstrations at trade shows in the U.S. and internationally, and also contributes to WreckMaster’s research and development department.<br /> <br /> “There are elements of concern that, if overlooked, can result in tragedy,” said Bouvia. “A step-by-step procedural process will lead to the reduction of the chance of injury, damage, or loss through better management of the risk associated with recovery.” He added that there are “checklists within the checklist” as well.<br /> <br /> Accordingly, Bouvia detailed Wreck- Master’s approach, which is distilled into an acronym: SCENE.<br /> • Survey<br /> • Calculate<br /> • Explain<br /> • No’s<br /> • Execute<br /> <br /> SURVEY<br /> To demonstrate this sequence of events, Bouvia used a typical heavy-duty recovery job as an example. The first step in the Wreck- Master sequence called SURVEY consists of information taken when the tower receives the initial call. Here is a sample list of notes taken from the State Police:<br /> • Tractor trailer rollover, loaded with garbage, lost entire load<br /> • Both northbound & southbound lanes blocked<br /> • “Major mess”<br /> • Upon arrival, noted 100-yard walking floor four-axle trailer destroyed.<br /> • Garbage covering all southbound lanes<br /> • Tractor lying on driver’s side, wedged atop guardrail in northbound passing lane<br /> <br /> When the tower arrives on scene, the “survey” begins, said Bouvia, “with first addressing officials and a visual inspection to ascertain and gather information.” The following are taken into account:<br /> • Collaborate and Coordinate<br /> • Traffic Control<br /> • Manpower/Staffing<br /> • Mutual Aid<br /> • Casualty Condition<br /> • Fuel/Oil & HAZMAT<br /> • Load/Product<br /> • Equipment/Services<br /> • Recovery Methods<br /> • Recovery equipment<br /> • Site restoration<br /> <br /> “Collaborating efforts of all responders on scene,” continued Bouvia, “is often a checklist in itself.” A job like this may attract the following people to the scene:<br /> • Law enforcement<br /> • Fire and rescue<br /> • emergency Medical Personnel<br /> • environmental Protection Agency<br /> • Media<br /> <br /> “A survey of the incident begins with the casualty, debris, and terrain,” said Bouvia, “which also require a list.”<br /> • Number of objects (tractor and trailer)<br /> • Condition of objects: tractor towable, trailer blown apart; further disassembly and Landoll required for transport<br /> • Debris field: 120 yards of empty roll-off boxes required for containment and transport of garbage<br /> • Traffic management situation: State Police assisting in traffic management<br /> <br /> CALCULATE<br /> The next step, CALCULATE, involves determining the weights and bulk of vehicles and/or objects that require moving, “along with surface and conditions,” said Bouvia. “This will help establish resistances, anchor abilities, and equipment and rigging requirements.” An incident of this magnitude would require a list of equipment and personnel that may include the following:<br /> • An incident commander<br /> • Certified traffic control manager<br /> • Recovery equipment: 60-ton rotator (with operator) to lift and load trailer pieces<br /> • 20-ton tow truck and operator for tractor<br /> • Roll-off trucks, drivers, and containers<br /> • Transport tractors and trailers for load and destroyed trailer<br /> • Loader and Bobcat and operators to gather and load debris<br /> • Cleanup and site restoration: incident recovery trailer containing traffic control devices, generator, cutting saws, torches, welder, pressure washer, tools, fuel evacuation pumps and containers, shovels, brooms, lighting, absorbents<br /> • Bouvia noted that on-scene personnel need to consider additional requirements such as equipment and personnel that are not part of the recovery companies’ fleet or in-house resources. These requirements — for example, machinery, transport vessels, or a HAZMAT team — must be sublet and contracted as mutual aid.<br /> <br /> “Mutual aid resources for equipment and/or manpower must be made conveniently available with contact numbers listed or preloaded as speed-dial numbers on a cell phone,” explained Bouvia.<br /> <br /> EXPLAIN<br /> Meanwhile, everything at the incident site should be listed, photographed and recorded in a detailed, written report to be summarized and submitted with billing invoices. While this is going on, said Bouvia, it’s important to keep other responders informed by explaining what is being done and why.<br /> <br /> “Once the incident area is cleared of any debris and secured,” continued Bouvia, “the recovery of the vehicles and/or loads can be achieved, and recovery vehicles are placed and rigging layups are set.”<br /> <br /> NO’S<br /> With loading completed, the tower should conduct a brief walkaround inspection to check the NO’s.<br /> <br /> “This step is critical to the discipline,” said Bouvia. “Here is where all the connections in the rigging are validated, line length and boom position observed, and kill zones established. This is the step in which if anything is observed that needs attention, it must be addressed at this time before winches are engaged.” With those steps in the checklist completed, it’s time for the final item:<br /> <br /> EXECUTE<br /> As to this step, Bouvia simply said, “Do it once and do it right!”

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