TR Footnotes FN_0512 : Page 23

TRUCKS WHEN FLY “The T & R Footnotes x May 2012 x 23 On April 3, 2012, the National Weather Service said that as many as 17 tornadoes touched down during violent weather that left a path of destruction across the Dallas / Fort Worth Metroplex. NWS meteorologist Bill Bunting said this tornado was “one of the most substantial” he’s seen in his 10 years at the National Weather Service. Peak winds were estimated at 130 miles per hour which is the high end of the EF-2 scale. The Red Cross estimated that 650 homes were damaged in the city of Lancaster, one of the hardest hit areas. The nearby Schneider National Operations Center facility located near Lancaster in far south Dallas was the focal point of many news agencies as the tornadoes lifted trailers hundreds of feet in the air on live television. The unmistakable Schneider orange was a prevalent sight during the helicopter reporting of the weather event as dozens of tractors, trailers, and other items from their facility were tossed about and piled in various locations by the power of the storm. As the winds died down the devastation was clear. Despite having over 100 trucks and trailers damaged, including many obvious total losses, there was a silver lining in that there were no serious injuries and no loss of life associated with the events. As the newscast emphasized the drama of the situation and trailers were airborne on television, the leadership of The Towing Network, whose national call center operations are also located in the Metroplex area, took action on behalf of their client, Schneider National. Jeff St. Pierre, President of The Towing Network, reached out to his points of contact at Schneider’s headquarters in Green Bay, Wisconsin and offered his company’s services to manage the event for Schneider as well as to deploy equipment immediately. Many Schneider officials were not yet aware of the situation as it was happening in real time as they spoke. The Towing Network was engaged immediately to oversee the clean-up and reached out to its primary providers in the area. Many other providers to The Towing Network offered their services and The Towing Network was greatly appreciative of the response. Had this been an event that affected public roadways, this support would have been greatly needed and Jeff St. Pierre was very thankful for the generous offers from his service provider network. Rick Chron, General Manager for United Road Towing’s companies in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex, dispatched four heavy duty trucks to the scene within minutes and was tasked with being the Incident Commander for the operation until complete. Upon arriving on the scene the operators knew they had a significant task ahead, as did everyone watching the overhead footage on televisions nationwide. The response times of The Towing Network and the resources from the towing companies sent to the scene were impressive. The Dallas Shop Manager for Schneider National’s Operations Center was overheard saying the tow trucks were on scene even before the local team came out of their shelter. More storms were looming and the threat was large but the concerted effort of the teams from Signature Towing, Walnut Hill Wrecker, Cornish Wrecker, and B & B Wrecker were able to pull off an amazing feat. When the news helicopters took off the next morning and began shooting footage of the Schneider National lot, they immediately found they would need something else to report on. Though the scene was by no means clear, the towing operators on-site had moved so much equipment that what had been easy to make into sensationalized national news was now far from resembling chaos as most of the casualties had been picked up, lined up, or drug into less precarious positions. The clean-up effort continued throughout the next day and a bit longer overall, including some off-site clean-ups for trailers that flew larger distances but, all in all, the towing companies proved the value of our industry and assisted a national freight company when they needed it most. In total, about 200 pieces of equipment were moved and the customer was able to carry on normal operations shortly after the storm had passed, even as the towing operators worked to clean up the mess left by Mother Nature. ...” inable as unimag w damage “Those things flying are semi trailers, lifted hundreds of feet up in the air by the extremely strong tornadoes in Dallas County, Texas. It’s an emergency situation down there right now, and it seems it’s not going to stop any time soon.” National Weather Service stated that “meteorologists confirmed a large and dangerous tornado... This is a dangerous situation ... seek shelter now!! This is a tornado emergency for Dallas.”

WHEN TRUCKS TRUCKS FLY

On April 3, 2012, the National Weather Service said that as many as 17 tornadoes touched down during violent weather that left a path of destruction across the Dallas / Fort Worth Metroplex. NWS meteorologist Bill Bunting said this tornado was “one of the most substantial” he’s seen in his 10 years at the National Weather Service. Peak winds were estimated at 130 miles per hour which is the high end of the EF-2 scale. The Red Cross estimated that 650 homes were damaged in the city of Lancaster, one of the hardest hit areas. The nearby Schneider National Operations Center facility located near Lancaster in far south Dallas was the focal point of many news agencies as the tornadoes lifted trailers hundreds of feet in the air on live television.<br /> <br /> The unmistakable Schneider orange was a prevalent sight during the helicopter reporting of the weather event as dozens of tractors, trailers, and other items from their facility were tossed about and piled in various locations by the power of the storm. As the winds died down the devastation was clear. Despite having over 100 trucks and trailers damaged, including many obvious total losses, there was a silver lining in that there were no serious injuries and no loss of life associated with the events.<br /> <br /> As the newscast emphasized the drama of the situation and trailers were airborne on television, the leadership of The Towing Network, whose national call center operations are also located in the Metroplex area, took action on behalf of their client, Schneider National. Jeff St. Pierre, President of The Towing Network, reached out to his points of contact at Schneider’s headquarters in Green Bay, Wisconsin and offered his company’s services to manage the event for Schneider as well as to deploy equipment immediately. Many Schneider officials were not yet aware of the situation as it was happening in real time as they spoke. The Towing Network was engaged immediately to oversee the cleanup and reached out to its primary providers in the area. Many other providers to The Towing Network offered their services and The Towing Network was greatly appreciative of the response. Had this been an event that affected public roadways, this support would have been greatly needed and Jeff St. Pierre was very thankful for the generous offers from his service provider network.<br /> <br /> Rick Chron, General Manager for United Road Towing’s companies in the Dallas- Fort Worth Metroplex, dispatched four heavy duty trucks to the scene within minutes and was tasked with being the Incident Commander for the operation until complete. Upon arriving on the scene the operators knew they had a significant task ahead, as did everyone watching the overhead footage on televisions nationwide. The response times of The Towing Network and the resources from the towing companies sent to the scene were impressive. The Dallas Shop Manager for Schneider National’s Operations Center was overheard saying the tow trucks were on scene even before the local team came out of their shelter.<br /> <br /> More storms were looming and the threat was large but the concerted effort of the teams from Signature Towing, Walnut Hill Wrecker, Cornish Wrecker, and B & B Wrecker were able to pull off an amazing feat. When the news helicopters took off the next morning and began shooting footage of the Schneider National lot, they immediately found they would need something else to report on. Though the scene was by no means clear, the towing operators on-site had moved so much equipment that what had been easy to make into sensationalized national news was now far from resembling chaos as most of the casualties had been picked up, lined up, or drug into less precarious positions.<br /> <br /> The clean-up effort continued throughout the next day and a bit longer overall, including some off-site clean-ups for trailers that flew larger distances but, all in all, the towing companies proved the value of our industry and assisted a national freight company when they needed it most. In total, about 200 pieces of equipment were moved and the customer was able to carry on normal operations shortly after the storm had passed, even as the towing operators worked to clean up the mess left by Mother Nature.<br /> <br /> The Schneider National facilities following a tornado that ripped through the area, causing extensive damage to the Wisconsin-based trucking company’s operating center.<br /> <br /> The operating center is described as one of the company’s larger facilities in the area. The building did not sustain major damage in the storm, but the loss of equipment in the yard was described as “massive.”<br /> <br /> Lance LaBarba, the on scene supervisor said, “Schneider was able to reopen their facilities 4 hours after we started and within 8 hours they were operating at 100%. At 23 hours, 95% of the recovery was complete. Everyone did an amazing job. There were no disagreements or arguments, just hard work. “<br /> <br /> It is estimated that these trailers flew almost 300 feet in the air. They were finally found over a mile away and were recovered by Walnut Hill Wrecker out of 3 homes. All three residences had people at home when the storm hit but, thankfully, no one was hurt. One of the homes was completely demolished.

Previous Page  Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here